Schneeballsystem: Millionenstrafe für Bitcoin-Mining ...

The Biggest Scams In The Crypto History

The cryptocurrency market is often compared to the Wild West. Digital gold, lawlessness, and unlimited Internet space attract not only honest people but also rascals. Today we will show you the loudest scam projects and cyber-attacks that seriously shattered the crypto society.
PayCoin
A mix of cloud mining and Ponzi scheme, which was promoted by Geniuses at Work Corporation Miners (GAW) in 2014. These guys make the first move by renting and selling virtual HashSet miners, which helped them form a loyal audience. Seeing that this project began to go down, the team decided to invent their own coin — PayCoin. People were promised a breakthrough technology, support from banks and other organizations, huge profits, free and fast transactions all around the world. As a result, the project started just awesome, which attracted the attention of a large number of miners and users. As you can guess all creators’ promises didn’t come true — Paycoin started to fall and users filed a lot of court complaint.
In the fall of 2018, the creator of PayCoin, Joshua Garza, was sentenced to 21 months in prison, obliging investors to pay damages of $9.2 million, although the total amount of financial investments was over $54 million.
BitConnect
Do you know how to tell that you’re participating in a scam? Just start with “Wasa Wasa Wasup BitConnect” as Carlos Matos did. BitConnect platform appeared in 2016 and immediately announced its intention to join the elite of the digital economy, bringing super-profits to all project participants without exception. The essence of the criminal scheme was simple: “Invest and get 100% and more.” The organizers promised investors an income of 365% per year! After the enormous excitement of the crypto market, the cost of the BitConnect token was equal to $463. This attracted the attention of reputable persons like Mike Novogratz, Charlie Lee, and Vitalik Buterin. For example, the creator of Litecoin — Charlie Lee — twitted the following:
“From the surface, BitConnect seems like a classic Ponzi scheme. I wouldn’t invest in it and wouldn’t recommend anyone else to.”
But even after such concerns, many people continued to invest in BitConnect. However, in early January 2018, the project unexpectedly turned down all of the activities and closed its platform. Investors were left with nothing. According to general estimates, the investors were deceived for more than $2.5 billion! In the summer of 2018, the head of Bitconnect India Divyesh Darji was arrested.
Beware that on July 1, 2019, a project Bitconnect 2.0 can be launched according to the news posted on Twitterby the same-named user.
Ifan and Pincoin
Start-ups Ifan and Pincoin, owned by the Vietnamese company Modern Tech, raised a whopping $660 million from approximately 32.000 people. The majority of the victims were the citizens of Vietnam. This scam project was labeled the “largest exit scam in recent memory” by TechCrunch.Project’s marketing strategy was so perfect that it was impossible to resist. So Ifan was promoted as “the most advanced social network” for celebrities and their fans. On the other side, Pincoin attracted investors with a promised investment return of 40% per month. The creators of Pincoin wrote about the development of an online platform covering an advertising network, a service for auctions, an investment portal, and P2P platform based on the blockchain.
But in fact both ICOs used a Ponzi scheme: users invested money, received their interest, brought friends and received additional interest. After some time, Modern Tech stopped paying out dividends in fiat and invited users to switch to their own tokens. As a result, they just made a fool of the investors.
This provoked massive rallies in front of the Modern Tech office, during which investors demanded a refund. But the scammers just escaped into the night with a $660 million jackpot.
Mt.Gox
In 2014 Mt.Gox exchange platform was one of the most popular resources for Bitcoin trading: it accounted for more than 70% of all transactions with BTC. A real tidbit, isn’t it?
Unfortunately, Mt.Gox was slowly turning into chaos. In the fall of 2013, US federal agents collected $5 million from the company’s bank account, since Mt.Gox was not registered as a financial intermediary. At the same time, Coinlab, the company’s former partner, filed a lawsuit against Mt.Gox, demanding $75 million. The lawsuit stated that Mt.Gox violated the terms of the agreement with Coinlab and continued to trade in the United States and Canada.
These problems led to failures with the platform. For example, American users waited for months to withdraw funds. In February 2014, Mt.Gox stopped the withdrawal of coins at all and the CEO of Mt.Gox — Mark Karpeles — refused to give any comments. Around the same time, an internal company document became available to the press explaining the reason for the failures — over the past several years around BTC 745,000 were stolen from the service. The total amount worth around $450 million at the time! What’s more, this was approximately 7% of all Bitcoin existing at the time.
“Even the sloppiest of audits should have shown that something had gone wrong, that money was flowing out of Gox accounts.” — The Verge.
Later the 200,000 stolen Bitcoins was found on an old wallet of the company. However, approximately 650,000 remain lost forever. According to Mt.Gox version, hackers used a bug in the transaction system that existed from the first day and quietly transferred small amounts of coins to their wallets. For sure the Mt. Gox case is the biggest crypto heist in history.No doubts, scam projects, and hack attacks will continue to emerge in a crypto world. Unfortunately, there is no universal remedy from them, but here are a few tips on how to reduce the risks of being scammed:
Like and share this article if you find it useful. Want more interesting articles on the crypto world? Follow us onMedium, Twitter, Facebook, and Reddit to get Stealthex.io updates and the latest news about the crypto world. For all requests message us at [[email protected]](mailto:[email protected]).
submitted by Stealthex_io to dogecoin [link] [comments]

Anyone here bought an LTC mining contract from genesis before? Want some feedback on the returns

Hi people. I'm thinking of purchasing a Genesis mining contract to mine LTC.
For those who bought a contract with them. How's the returns so far??
Also. Do you think its too late to hope for an okay return?
https://www.genesis-mining.com
submitted by reddit_abc to litecoin [link] [comments]

The Biggest Scams In The Crypto History

The cryptocurrency market is often compared to the Wild West. Digital gold, lawlessness, and unlimited Internet space attract not only honest people but also rascals. Today we will show you the loudest scam projects and cyber-attacks that seriously shattered the crypto society.
PayCoin
A mix of cloud mining and Ponzi scheme, which was promoted by Geniuses at Work Corporation Miners (GAW) in 2014. These guys make the first move by renting and selling virtual HashSet miners, which helped them form a loyal audience. Seeing that this project began to go down, the team decided to invent their own coin — PayCoin. People were promised a breakthrough technology, support from banks and other organizations, huge profits, free and fast transactions all around the world. As a result, the project started just awesome, which attracted the attention of a large number of miners and users. As you can guess all creators’ promises didn’t come true — Paycoin started to fall and users filed a lot of court complaint.
In the fall of 2018, the creator of PayCoin, Joshua Garza, was sentenced to 21 months in prison, obliging investors to pay damages of $9.2 million, although the total amount of financial investments was over $54 million.
BitConnect
Do you know how to tell that you’re participating in a scam? Just start with “Wasa Wasa Wasup BitConnect” as Carlos Matos did. BitConnect platform appeared in 2016 and immediately announced its intention to join the elite of the digital economy, bringing super-profits to all project participants without exception. The essence of the criminal scheme was simple: “Invest and get 100% and more.” The organizers promised investors an income of 365% per year! After the enormous excitement of the crypto market, the cost of the BitConnect token was equal to $463. This attracted the attention of reputable persons like Mike Novogratz, Charlie Lee, and Vitalik Buterin. For example, the creator of Litecoin — Charlie Lee — twitted the following:
“From the surface, BitConnect seems like a classic Ponzi scheme. I wouldn’t invest in it and wouldn’t recommend anyone else to.”
But even after such concerns, many people continued to invest in BitConnect. However, in early January 2018, the project unexpectedly turned down all of the activities and closed its platform. Investors were left with nothing. According to general estimates, the investors were deceived for more than $2.5 billion! In the summer of 2018, the head of Bitconnect India Divyesh Darji was arrested.
Beware that on July 1, 2019, a project Bitconnect 2.0 can be launched according to the news posted on Twitterby the same-named user.
Ifan and Pincoin
Start-ups Ifan and Pincoin, owned by the Vietnamese company Modern Tech, raised a whopping $660 million from approximately 32.000 people. The majority of the victims were the citizens of Vietnam. This scam project was labeled the “largest exit scam in recent memory” by TechCrunch.Project’s marketing strategy was so perfect that it was impossible to resist. So Ifan was promoted as “the most advanced social network” for celebrities and their fans. On the other side, Pincoin attracted investors with a promised investment return of 40% per month. The creators of Pincoin wrote about the development of an online platform covering an advertising network, a service for auctions, an investment portal, and P2P platform based on the blockchain.
But in fact both ICOs used a Ponzi scheme: users invested money, received their interest, brought friends and received additional interest. After some time, Modern Tech stopped paying out dividends in fiat and invited users to switch to their own tokens. As a result, they just made a fool of the investors.
This provoked massive rallies in front of the Modern Tech office, during which investors demanded a refund. But the scammers just escaped into the night with a $660 million jackpot.
Mt.Gox
In 2014 Mt.Gox exchange platform was one of the most popular resources for Bitcoin trading: it accounted for more than 70% of all transactions with BTC. A real tidbit, isn’t it?
Unfortunately, Mt.Gox was slowly turning into chaos. In the fall of 2013, US federal agents collected $5 million from the company’s bank account, since Mt.Gox was not registered as a financial intermediary. At the same time, Coinlab, the company’s former partner, filed a lawsuit against Mt.Gox, demanding $75 million. The lawsuit stated that Mt.Gox violated the terms of the agreement with Coinlab and continued to trade in the United States and Canada.
These problems led to failures with the platform. For example, American users waited for months to withdraw funds. In February 2014, Mt.Gox stopped the withdrawal of coins at all and the CEO of Mt.Gox — Mark Karpeles — refused to give any comments. Around the same time, an internal company document became available to the press explaining the reason for the failures — over the past several years around BTC 745,000 were stolen from the service. The total amount worth around $450 million at the time! What’s more, this was approximately 7% of all Bitcoin existing at the time.
“Even the sloppiest of audits should have shown that something had gone wrong, that money was flowing out of Gox accounts.” — The Verge.
Later the 200,000 stolen Bitcoins was found on an old wallet of the company. However, approximately 650,000 remain lost forever. According to Mt.Gox version, hackers used a bug in the transaction system that existed from the first day and quietly transferred small amounts of coins to their wallets. For sure the Mt. Gox case is the biggest crypto heist in history.No doubts, scam projects, and hack attacks will continue to emerge in a crypto world. Unfortunately, there is no universal remedy from them, but here are a few tips on how to reduce the risks of being scammed:
Like and share this article if you find it useful. Want more interesting articles on the crypto world? Follow us onMedium, Twitter, Facebook, and Reddit to get Stealthex.io updates and the latest news about the crypto world. For all requests message us at [[email protected]](mailto:[email protected]).
submitted by Stealthex_io to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

GAW Miners to IPO "HashCoin" -- guarantees returns of 400%. In the words of Kirk Lazarus, you never go full Ponzi, man.

GAW Miners to IPO submitted by ozme to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Checking GAW against the Securities and Exchange Commission list of Ponzi Red Flags.....

I may be a bit slow but, finally, I'm getting suspicious and have begun to ask myself questions that, if I were smarter, I’d have asked before investing any money. Like, is there any proof GAW miners is mining anything at all? The answer to that is technically no, there isn't. The question then becomes where are their payouts coming from then? The official answer to this is that GAW make their money by renting out their mining power to private companies and it's this income that provides the customers with their ever diminishing payouts. Though who these companies are is a mystery. And, in any case, that seems like a peculiar business model. Why isn't GAW’s business of the sort that its website and marketing implies it is? i.e a cloud mining service that mines bitcoin and sells shares of the mining power to customers. The fact that the thing looks like a Ponzi scheme is inescapable. A smart and more worldly person would probably have spotted that straight away.
How does slow witted person like me finally identify a Ponzi scheme then? Well, he checks his experience against the US Securities and Exchange Commission list of Ponzi Scheme red flags:
  1. High investment returns with little or no risk. Every investment carries some degree of risk, and investments yielding higher returns typically involve more risk. Be highly suspicious of any "guaranteed" investment opportunity.
    1. Overly consistent returns. Investment values tend to go up and down over time, especially those offering potentially high returns. Be suspect of an investment that continues to generate regular, positive returns regardless of overall market conditions.
    2. Unregistered investments. Ponzi schemes typically involve investments that have not been registered with the SEC or with state regulators. Registration is important because it provides investors with access to key information about the company's management, products, services, and finances.
    3. Unlicensed sellers. Federal and state securities laws require investment professionals and their firms to be licensed or registered. Most Ponzi schemes involve unlicensed individuals or unregistered firms.
    4. Secretive and/or complex strategies. Avoiding investments you do not understand, or for which you cannot get complete information, is a good rule of thumb.
    5. Issues with paperwork. Do not accept excuses regarding why you cannot review information about an investment in writing. Also, account statement errors and inconsistencies may be signs that funds are not being invested as promised.
    6. Difficulty receiving payments. Be suspicious if you do not receive a payment or have difficulty cashing out your investment. Keep in mind that Ponzi scheme promoters routinely encourage participants to "roll over" investments and sometimes promise returns offering even higher returns on the amount rolled over.
Of course, GAW miners gets a few red flags but not across the board. It didn’t necessarily promise ‘high’ returns – just consistent ones that were higher than you’d receive elsewhere. Eventually these consistent and ‘higher than elsewhere’ returns became inconsistent and low. A big red flag is the company being unregistered with the Securities and Exchange Commission:
3.12 GAW as defined herein is not engaged in providing investment products, regulated commodities, or financial products of any type or kind. GAW is not registered as a securities broker-dealer or an investment adviser either with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (“SEC”) or with any state securities regulatory authority, and does not offer any product or service based upon the sale or acquisition of securities or derivative based products or services. GAW is neither licensed nor qualified to provide investment advice and you are specifically and adamantly advised not to rely upon anything posted/communicated/implied or expressed by GAW. - From the GAW Miners Terms and Conditions
So, it certainly is unregistered and unlicensed. The fifth red flag is particularly interesting – GAW does indeed appear to have a secretive and/or complex strategy. Far more complex and secretive than you’d think a cloud mining service needs to be. One that involves renting out mining power to unknown private companies, making payouts based on pool estimates rather than actual payments from mining, mysterious negotiations that involve over-the-horizon promises just as soon as they’re completed and a very strange ‘store credit’ type scheme in which, if we stick with the company and mine 'hashpoints' we'll be, one day, much rewarded with 'hashcoins' which will be very, very valuable.
Issues with paperwork? There isn’t any paperwork. I suppose this is an advantage of selling mining shares as if they are property rather than a contract which would necessarily involve a contract.
Finally, difficulty receiving payments. There have, I believe, been a fair few people who’ve had difficulties with withdrawing their money. The payments themselves have plummeted though whether that counts as a difficulty I don’t know. I’d be inclined to give GAW a pass on this one but just because I’ve not had the difficulty myself.
Anyway, I just wanted to put all that down here before I conclude that GAW looks very much like a Ponzi scheme and I’m a goddamned idiot for buying into it and before I go log-in to Zen cloud and panic buy every hashlet I own.
submitted by MichaelSeville to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

The Biggest Scams In The Crypto History

The cryptocurrency market is often compared to the Wild West. Digital gold, lawlessness, and unlimited Internet space attract not only honest people but also rascals. Today we will show you the loudest scam projects and cyber-attacks that seriously shattered the crypto society.
PayCoin
A mix of cloud mining and Ponzi scheme, which was promoted by Geniuses at Work Corporation Miners (GAW) in 2014. These guys make the first move by renting and selling virtual HashSet miners, which helped them form a loyal audience. Seeing that this project began to go down, the team decided to invent their own coin — PayCoin. People were promised a breakthrough technology, support from banks and other organizations, huge profits, free and fast transactions all around the world. As a result, the project started just awesome, which attracted the attention of a large number of miners and users. As you can guess all creators’ promises didn’t come true — Paycoin started to fall and users filed a lot of court complaint.
In the fall of 2018, the creator of PayCoin, Joshua Garza, was sentenced to 21 months in prison, obliging investors to pay damages of $9.2 million, although the total amount of financial investments was over $54 million.
BitConnect
Do you know how to tell that you’re participating in a scam? Just start with “Wasa Wasa Wasup BitConnect” as Carlos Matos did. BitConnect platform appeared in 2016 and immediately announced its intention to join the elite of the digital economy, bringing super-profits to all project participants without exception. The essence of the criminal scheme was simple: “Invest and get 100% and more.” The organizers promised investors an income of 365% per year! After the enormous excitement of the crypto market, the cost of the BitConnect token was equal to $463. This attracted the attention of reputable persons like Mike Novogratz, Charlie Lee, and Vitalik Buterin. For example, the creator of Litecoin — Charlie Lee — twitted the following:
“From the surface, BitConnect seems like a classic Ponzi scheme. I wouldn’t invest in it and wouldn’t recommend anyone else to.”
But even after such concerns, many people continued to invest in BitConnect. However, in early January 2018, the project unexpectedly turned down all of the activities and closed its platform. Investors were left with nothing. According to general estimates, the investors were deceived for more than $2.5 billion! In the summer of 2018, the head of Bitconnect India Divyesh Darji was arrested.
Beware that on July 1, 2019, a project Bitconnect 2.0 can be launched according to the news posted on Twitterby the same-named user.
Ifan and Pincoin
Start-ups Ifan and Pincoin, owned by the Vietnamese company Modern Tech, raised a whopping $660 million from approximately 32.000 people. The majority of the victims were the citizens of Vietnam. This scam project was labeled the “largest exit scam in recent memory” by TechCrunch.Project’s marketing strategy was so perfect that it was impossible to resist. So Ifan was promoted as “the most advanced social network” for celebrities and their fans. On the other side, Pincoin attracted investors with a promised investment return of 40% per month. The creators of Pincoin wrote about the development of an online platform covering an advertising network, a service for auctions, an investment portal, and P2P platform based on the blockchain.
But in fact both ICOs used a Ponzi scheme: users invested money, received their interest, brought friends and received additional interest. After some time, Modern Tech stopped paying out dividends in fiat and invited users to switch to their own tokens. As a result, they just made a fool of the investors.
This provoked massive rallies in front of the Modern Tech office, during which investors demanded a refund. But the scammers just escaped into the night with a $660 million jackpot.
Mt.Gox
In 2014 Mt.Gox exchange platform was one of the most popular resources for Bitcoin trading: it accounted for more than 70% of all transactions with BTC. A real tidbit, isn’t it?
Unfortunately, Mt.Gox was slowly turning into chaos. In the fall of 2013, US federal agents collected $5 million from the company’s bank account, since Mt.Gox was not registered as a financial intermediary. At the same time, Coinlab, the company’s former partner, filed a lawsuit against Mt.Gox, demanding $75 million. The lawsuit stated that Mt.Gox violated the terms of the agreement with Coinlab and continued to trade in the United States and Canada.
These problems led to failures with the platform. For example, American users waited for months to withdraw funds. In February 2014, Mt.Gox stopped the withdrawal of coins at all and the CEO of Mt.Gox — Mark Karpeles — refused to give any comments. Around the same time, an internal company document became available to the press explaining the reason for the failures — over the past several years around BTC 745,000 were stolen from the service. The total amount worth around $450 million at the time! What’s more, this was approximately 7% of all Bitcoin existing at the time.
“Even the sloppiest of audits should have shown that something had gone wrong, that money was flowing out of Gox accounts.” — The Verge.
Later the 200,000 stolen Bitcoins was found on an old wallet of the company. However, approximately 650,000 remain lost forever. According to Mt.Gox version, hackers used a bug in the transaction system that existed from the first day and quietly transferred small amounts of coins to their wallets. For sure the Mt. Gox case is the biggest crypto heist in history.No doubts, scam projects, and hack attacks will continue to emerge in a crypto world. Unfortunately, there is no universal remedy from them, but here are a few tips on how to reduce the risks of being scammed:
Like and share this article if you find it useful. Want more interesting articles on the crypto world? Follow us onMedium, Twitter, Facebook, and Reddit to get Stealthex.io updates and the latest news about the crypto world. For all requests message us at [[email protected]](mailto:[email protected]).
submitted by Stealthex_io to BitcoinCA [link] [comments]

The Biggest Scams In The Crypto History

The cryptocurrency market is often compared to the Wild West. Digital gold, lawlessness, and unlimited Internet space attract not only honest people but also rascals. Today we will show you the loudest scam projects and cyber-attacks that seriously shattered the crypto society.
PayCoin
A mix of cloud mining and Ponzi scheme, which was promoted by Geniuses at Work Corporation Miners (GAW) in 2014. These guys make the first move by renting and selling virtual HashSet miners, which helped them form a loyal audience. Seeing that this project began to go down, the team decided to invent their own coin — PayCoin. People were promised a breakthrough technology, support from banks and other organizations, huge profits, free and fast transactions all around the world. As a result, the project started just awesome, which attracted the attention of a large number of miners and users. As you can guess all creators’ promises didn’t come true — Paycoin started to fall and users filed a lot of court complaint.
In the fall of 2018, the creator of PayCoin, Joshua Garza, was sentenced to 21 months in prison, obliging investors to pay damages of $9.2 million, although the total amount of financial investments was over $54 million.
BitConnect
Do you know how to tell that you’re participating in a scam? Just start with “Wasa Wasa Wasup BitConnect” as Carlos Matos did. BitConnect platform appeared in 2016 and immediately announced its intention to join the elite of the digital economy, bringing super-profits to all project participants without exception. The essence of the criminal scheme was simple: “Invest and get 100% and more.” The organizers promised investors an income of 365% per year! After the enormous excitement of the crypto market, the cost of the BitConnect token was equal to $463. This attracted the attention of reputable persons like Mike Novogratz, Charlie Lee, and Vitalik Buterin. For example, the creator of Litecoin — Charlie Lee — twitted the following:
“From the surface, BitConnect seems like a classic Ponzi scheme. I wouldn’t invest in it and wouldn’t recommend anyone else to.”
But even after such concerns, many people continued to invest in BitConnect. However, in early January 2018, the project unexpectedly turned down all of the activities and closed its platform. Investors were left with nothing. According to general estimates, the investors were deceived for more than $2.5 billion! In the summer of 2018, the head of Bitconnect India Divyesh Darji was arrested.
Beware that on July 1, 2019, a project Bitconnect 2.0 can be launched according to the news posted on Twitterby the same-named user.
Ifan and Pincoin
Start-ups Ifan and Pincoin, owned by the Vietnamese company Modern Tech, raised a whopping $660 million from approximately 32.000 people. The majority of the victims were the citizens of Vietnam. This scam project was labeled the “largest exit scam in recent memory” by TechCrunch.Project’s marketing strategy was so perfect that it was impossible to resist. So Ifan was promoted as “the most advanced social network” for celebrities and their fans. On the other side, Pincoin attracted investors with a promised investment return of 40% per month. The creators of Pincoin wrote about the development of an online platform covering an advertising network, a service for auctions, an investment portal, and P2P platform based on the blockchain.
But in fact both ICOs used a Ponzi scheme: users invested money, received their interest, brought friends and received additional interest. After some time, Modern Tech stopped paying out dividends in fiat and invited users to switch to their own tokens. As a result, they just made a fool of the investors.
This provoked massive rallies in front of the Modern Tech office, during which investors demanded a refund. But the scammers just escaped into the night with a $660 million jackpot.
Mt.Gox
In 2014 Mt.Gox exchange platform was one of the most popular resources for Bitcoin trading: it accounted for more than 70% of all transactions with BTC. A real tidbit, isn’t it?
Unfortunately, Mt.Gox was slowly turning into chaos. In the fall of 2013, US federal agents collected $5 million from the company’s bank account, since Mt.Gox was not registered as a financial intermediary. At the same time, Coinlab, the company’s former partner, filed a lawsuit against Mt.Gox, demanding $75 million. The lawsuit stated that Mt.Gox violated the terms of the agreement with Coinlab and continued to trade in the United States and Canada.
These problems led to failures with the platform. For example, American users waited for months to withdraw funds. In February 2014, Mt.Gox stopped the withdrawal of coins at all and the CEO of Mt.Gox — Mark Karpeles — refused to give any comments. Around the same time, an internal company document became available to the press explaining the reason for the failures — over the past several years around BTC 745,000 were stolen from the service. The total amount worth around $450 million at the time! What’s more, this was approximately 7% of all Bitcoin existing at the time.
“Even the sloppiest of audits should have shown that something had gone wrong, that money was flowing out of Gox accounts.” — The Verge.
Later the 200,000 stolen Bitcoins was found on an old wallet of the company. However, approximately 650,000 remain lost forever. According to Mt.Gox version, hackers used a bug in the transaction system that existed from the first day and quietly transferred small amounts of coins to their wallets. For sure the Mt. Gox case is the biggest crypto heist in history.No doubts, scam projects, and hack attacks will continue to emerge in a crypto world. Unfortunately, there is no universal remedy from them, but here are a few tips on how to reduce the risks of being scammed:
Like and share this article if you find it useful. Want more interesting articles on the crypto world? Follow us onMedium, Twitter, Facebook, and Reddit to get Stealthex.io updates and the latest news about the crypto world. For all requests message us at [[email protected]](mailto:[email protected]).
submitted by Stealthex_io to CryptoCurrencyTrading [link] [comments]

GAW Zencloud mining disabled - miners upset

submitted by frugal-guy to CryptoCurrency [link] [comments]

The Biggest Scams In The Crypto History

The cryptocurrency market is often compared to the Wild West. Digital gold, lawlessness, and unlimited Internet space attract not only honest people but also rascals. Today we will show you the loudest scam projects and cyber-attacks that seriously shattered the crypto society.
PayCoin
A mix of cloud mining and Ponzi scheme, which was promoted by Geniuses at Work Corporation Miners (GAW) in 2014. These guys make the first move by renting and selling virtual HashSet miners, which helped them form a loyal audience. Seeing that this project began to go down, the team decided to invent their own coin — PayCoin. People were promised a breakthrough technology, support from banks and other organizations, huge profits, free and fast transactions all around the world. As a result, the project started just awesome, which attracted the attention of a large number of miners and users. As you can guess all creators’ promises didn’t come true — Paycoin started to fall and users filed a lot of court complaint.
In the fall of 2018, the creator of PayCoin, Joshua Garza, was sentenced to 21 months in prison, obliging investors to pay damages of $9.2 million, although the total amount of financial investments was over $54 million.
BitConnect
Do you know how to tell that you’re participating in a scam? Just start with “Wasa Wasa Wasup BitConnect” as Carlos Matos did. BitConnect platform appeared in 2016 and immediately announced its intention to join the elite of the digital economy, bringing super-profits to all project participants without exception. The essence of the criminal scheme was simple: “Invest and get 100% and more.” The organizers promised investors an income of 365% per year! After the enormous excitement of the crypto market, the cost of the BitConnect token was equal to $463. This attracted the attention of reputable persons like Mike Novogratz, Charlie Lee, and Vitalik Buterin. For example, the creator of Litecoin — Charlie Lee — twitted the following:
“From the surface, BitConnect seems like a classic Ponzi scheme. I wouldn’t invest in it and wouldn’t recommend anyone else to.”
But even after such concerns, many people continued to invest in BitConnect. However, in early January 2018, the project unexpectedly turned down all of the activities and closed its platform. Investors were left with nothing. According to general estimates, the investors were deceived for more than $2.5 billion! In the summer of 2018, the head of Bitconnect India Divyesh Darji was arrested.
Beware that on July 1, 2019, a project Bitconnect 2.0 can be launched according to the news posted on Twitterby the same-named user.
Ifan and Pincoin
Start-ups Ifan and Pincoin, owned by the Vietnamese company Modern Tech, raised a whopping $660 million from approximately 32.000 people. The majority of the victims were the citizens of Vietnam. This scam project was labeled the “largest exit scam in recent memory” by TechCrunch.Project’s marketing strategy was so perfect that it was impossible to resist. So Ifan was promoted as “the most advanced social network” for celebrities and their fans. On the other side, Pincoin attracted investors with a promised investment return of 40% per month. The creators of Pincoin wrote about the development of an online platform covering an advertising network, a service for auctions, an investment portal, and P2P platform based on the blockchain.
But in fact both ICOs used a Ponzi scheme: users invested money, received their interest, brought friends and received additional interest. After some time, Modern Tech stopped paying out dividends in fiat and invited users to switch to their own tokens. As a result, they just made a fool of the investors.
This provoked massive rallies in front of the Modern Tech office, during which investors demanded a refund. But the scammers just escaped into the night with a $660 million jackpot.
Mt.Gox
In 2014 Mt.Gox exchange platform was one of the most popular resources for Bitcoin trading: it accounted for more than 70% of all transactions with BTC. A real tidbit, isn’t it?
Unfortunately, Mt.Gox was slowly turning into chaos. In the fall of 2013, US federal agents collected $5 million from the company’s bank account, since Mt.Gox was not registered as a financial intermediary. At the same time, Coinlab, the company’s former partner, filed a lawsuit against Mt.Gox, demanding $75 million. The lawsuit stated that Mt.Gox violated the terms of the agreement with Coinlab and continued to trade in the United States and Canada.
These problems led to failures with the platform. For example, American users waited for months to withdraw funds. In February 2014, Mt.Gox stopped the withdrawal of coins at all and the CEO of Mt.Gox — Mark Karpeles — refused to give any comments. Around the same time, an internal company document became available to the press explaining the reason for the failures — over the past several years around BTC 745,000 were stolen from the service. The total amount worth around $450 million at the time! What’s more, this was approximately 7% of all Bitcoin existing at the time.
“Even the sloppiest of audits should have shown that something had gone wrong, that money was flowing out of Gox accounts.” — The Verge.
Later the 200,000 stolen Bitcoins was found on an old wallet of the company. However, approximately 650,000 remain lost forever. According to Mt.Gox version, hackers used a bug in the transaction system that existed from the first day and quietly transferred small amounts of coins to their wallets. For sure the Mt. Gox case is the biggest crypto heist in history.No doubts, scam projects, and hack attacks will continue to emerge in a crypto world. Unfortunately, there is no universal remedy from them, but here are a few tips on how to reduce the risks of being scammed:
Like and share this article if you find it useful. Want more interesting articles on the crypto world? Follow us onMedium, Twitter, Facebook, and Reddit to get Stealthex.io updates and the latest news about the crypto world. For all requests message us at [[email protected]](mailto:[email protected]).
submitted by Stealthex_io to btc [link] [comments]

GAW ZenCloud. WTH happened? Am I screwed?

Me and a friend bought a bunch of haslets and mined a bunch of hashpoints and btc and put it on the backburner for a long-term thing. Now some sequence of shit happened and I don't know if I can get my money back, can I? I mean, lots of people must have suffered damages. Is there a lawsuit or claim form? Or have I lost all of the money I was going to use for school? It was A LOT and it's going to take more than a year for me to recover if I save ferociously
submitted by zak13362 to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Can someone sum the GAWMiner drama for me?

I don't follow the latest VILLAIN OF THE MONTH with the GAWMinePaycoin/Hashlets and I am kind of lost in the scamchain.
Unfortunately there is lack of posts about it on /buttcoin as far as I can tell
Can someone sum it up for me? Who is scamming who? What is "paycoin" and "hashlet" and who is the big villain this time (except for the fascist state of course)?
submitted by throwmebone to Buttcoin [link] [comments]

The Biggest Scams In The Crypto History

The cryptocurrency market is often compared to the Wild West. Digital gold, lawlessness, and unlimited Internet space attract not only honest people but also rascals. Today we will show you the loudest scam projects and cyber-attacks that seriously shattered the crypto society.
PayCoin
A mix of cloud mining and Ponzi scheme, which was promoted by Geniuses at Work Corporation Miners (GAW) in 2014. These guys make the first move by renting and selling virtual HashSet miners, which helped them form a loyal audience. Seeing that this project began to go down, the team decided to invent their own coin — PayCoin. People were promised a breakthrough technology, support from banks and other organizations, huge profits, free and fast transactions all around the world. As a result, the project started just awesome, which attracted the attention of a large number of miners and users. As you can guess all creators’ promises didn’t come true — Paycoin started to fall and users filed a lot of court complaint.
In the fall of 2018, the creator of PayCoin, Joshua Garza, was sentenced to 21 months in prison, obliging investors to pay damages of $9.2 million, although the total amount of financial investments was over $54 million.
BitConnect
Do you know how to tell that you’re participating in a scam? Just start with “Wasa Wasa Wasup BitConnect” as Carlos Matos did. BitConnect platform appeared in 2016 and immediately announced its intention to join the elite of the digital economy, bringing super-profits to all project participants without exception. The essence of the criminal scheme was simple: “Invest and get 100% and more.” The organizers promised investors an income of 365% per year! After the enormous excitement of the crypto market, the cost of the BitConnect token was equal to $463. This attracted the attention of reputable persons like Mike Novogratz, Charlie Lee, and Vitalik Buterin. For example, the creator of Litecoin — Charlie Lee — twitted the following:
“From the surface, BitConnect seems like a classic Ponzi scheme. I wouldn’t invest in it and wouldn’t recommend anyone else to.”
But even after such concerns, many people continued to invest in BitConnect. However, in early January 2018, the project unexpectedly turned down all of the activities and closed its platform. Investors were left with nothing. According to general estimates, the investors were deceived for more than $2.5 billion! In the summer of 2018, the head of Bitconnect India Divyesh Darji was arrested.
Beware that on July 1, 2019, a project Bitconnect 2.0 can be launched according to the news posted on Twitterby the same-named user.
Ifan and Pincoin
Start-ups Ifan and Pincoin, owned by the Vietnamese company Modern Tech, raised a whopping $660 million from approximately 32.000 people. The majority of the victims were the citizens of Vietnam. This scam project was labeled the “largest exit scam in recent memory” by TechCrunch.Project’s marketing strategy was so perfect that it was impossible to resist. So Ifan was promoted as “the most advanced social network” for celebrities and their fans. On the other side, Pincoin attracted investors with a promised investment return of 40% per month. The creators of Pincoin wrote about the development of an online platform covering an advertising network, a service for auctions, an investment portal, and P2P platform based on the blockchain.
But in fact both ICOs used a Ponzi scheme: users invested money, received their interest, brought friends and received additional interest. After some time, Modern Tech stopped paying out dividends in fiat and invited users to switch to their own tokens. As a result, they just made a fool of the investors.
This provoked massive rallies in front of the Modern Tech office, during which investors demanded a refund. But the scammers just escaped into the night with a $660 million jackpot.
Mt.Gox
In 2014 Mt.Gox exchange platform was one of the most popular resources for Bitcoin trading: it accounted for more than 70% of all transactions with BTC. A real tidbit, isn’t it?
Unfortunately, Mt.Gox was slowly turning into chaos. In the fall of 2013, US federal agents collected $5 million from the company’s bank account, since Mt.Gox was not registered as a financial intermediary. At the same time, Coinlab, the company’s former partner, filed a lawsuit against Mt.Gox, demanding $75 million. The lawsuit stated that Mt.Gox violated the terms of the agreement with Coinlab and continued to trade in the United States and Canada.
These problems led to failures with the platform. For example, American users waited for months to withdraw funds. In February 2014, Mt.Gox stopped the withdrawal of coins at all and the CEO of Mt.Gox — Mark Karpeles — refused to give any comments. Around the same time, an internal company document became available to the press explaining the reason for the failures — over the past several years around BTC 745,000 were stolen from the service. The total amount worth around $450 million at the time! What’s more, this was approximately 7% of all Bitcoin existing at the time.
“Even the sloppiest of audits should have shown that something had gone wrong, that money was flowing out of Gox accounts.” — The Verge.
Later the 200,000 stolen Bitcoins was found on an old wallet of the company. However, approximately 650,000 remain lost forever. According to Mt.Gox version, hackers used a bug in the transaction system that existed from the first day and quietly transferred small amounts of coins to their wallets. For sure the Mt. Gox case is the biggest crypto heist in history.No doubts, scam projects, and hack attacks will continue to emerge in a crypto world. Unfortunately, there is no universal remedy from them, but here are a few tips on how to reduce the risks of being scammed:
Like and share this article if you find it useful. Want more interesting articles on the crypto world? Follow us onMedium, Twitter, Facebook, and Reddit to get Stealthex.io updates and the latest news about the crypto world. For all requests message us at [[email protected]](mailto:[email protected]).
submitted by Stealthex_io to Anarcho_Capitalism [link] [comments]

The Biggest Scams In The Crypto History

The cryptocurrency market is often compared to the Wild West. Digital gold, lawlessness, and unlimited Internet space attract not only honest people but also rascals. Today we will show you the loudest scam projects and cyber-attacks that seriously shattered the crypto society.
PayCoin
A mix of cloud mining and Ponzi scheme, which was promoted by Geniuses at Work Corporation Miners (GAW) in 2014. These guys make the first move by renting and selling virtual HashSet miners, which helped them form a loyal audience. Seeing that this project began to go down, the team decided to invent their own coin — PayCoin. People were promised a breakthrough technology, support from banks and other organizations, huge profits, free and fast transactions all around the world. As a result, the project started just awesome, which attracted the attention of a large number of miners and users. As you can guess all creators’ promises didn’t come true — Paycoin started to fall and users filed a lot of court complaint.
In the fall of 2018, the creator of PayCoin, Joshua Garza, was sentenced to 21 months in prison, obliging investors to pay damages of $9.2 million, although the total amount of financial investments was over $54 million.
BitConnect
Do you know how to tell that you’re participating in a scam? Just start with “Wasa Wasa Wasup BitConnect” as Carlos Matos did. BitConnect platform appeared in 2016 and immediately announced its intention to join the elite of the digital economy, bringing super-profits to all project participants without exception. The essence of the criminal scheme was simple: “Invest and get 100% and more.” The organizers promised investors an income of 365% per year! After the enormous excitement of the crypto market, the cost of the BitConnect token was equal to $463. This attracted the attention of reputable persons like Mike Novogratz, Charlie Lee, and Vitalik Buterin. For example, the creator of Litecoin — Charlie Lee — twitted the following:
“From the surface, BitConnect seems like a classic Ponzi scheme. I wouldn’t invest in it and wouldn’t recommend anyone else to.”
But even after such concerns, many people continued to invest in BitConnect. However, in early January 2018, the project unexpectedly turned down all of the activities and closed its platform. Investors were left with nothing. According to general estimates, the investors were deceived for more than $2.5 billion! In the summer of 2018, the head of Bitconnect India Divyesh Darji was arrested.
Beware that on July 1, 2019, a project Bitconnect 2.0 can be launched according to the news posted on Twitterby the same-named user.
Ifan and Pincoin
Start-ups Ifan and Pincoin, owned by the Vietnamese company Modern Tech, raised a whopping $660 million from approximately 32.000 people. The majority of the victims were the citizens of Vietnam. This scam project was labeled the “largest exit scam in recent memory” by TechCrunch.Project’s marketing strategy was so perfect that it was impossible to resist. So Ifan was promoted as “the most advanced social network” for celebrities and their fans. On the other side, Pincoin attracted investors with a promised investment return of 40% per month. The creators of Pincoin wrote about the development of an online platform covering an advertising network, a service for auctions, an investment portal, and P2P platform based on the blockchain.
But in fact both ICOs used a Ponzi scheme: users invested money, received their interest, brought friends and received additional interest. After some time, Modern Tech stopped paying out dividends in fiat and invited users to switch to their own tokens. As a result, they just made a fool of the investors.
This provoked massive rallies in front of the Modern Tech office, during which investors demanded a refund. But the scammers just escaped into the night with a $660 million jackpot.
Mt.Gox
In 2014 Mt.Gox exchange platform was one of the most popular resources for Bitcoin trading: it accounted for more than 70% of all transactions with BTC. A real tidbit, isn’t it?
Unfortunately, Mt.Gox was slowly turning into chaos. In the fall of 2013, US federal agents collected $5 million from the company’s bank account, since Mt.Gox was not registered as a financial intermediary. At the same time, Coinlab, the company’s former partner, filed a lawsuit against Mt.Gox, demanding $75 million. The lawsuit stated that Mt.Gox violated the terms of the agreement with Coinlab and continued to trade in the United States and Canada.
These problems led to failures with the platform. For example, American users waited for months to withdraw funds. In February 2014, Mt.Gox stopped the withdrawal of coins at all and the CEO of Mt.Gox — Mark Karpeles — refused to give any comments. Around the same time, an internal company document became available to the press explaining the reason for the failures — over the past several years around BTC 745,000 were stolen from the service. The total amount worth around $450 million at the time! What’s more, this was approximately 7% of all Bitcoin existing at the time.
“Even the sloppiest of audits should have shown that something had gone wrong, that money was flowing out of Gox accounts.” — The Verge.
Later the 200,000 stolen Bitcoins was found on an old wallet of the company. However, approximately 650,000 remain lost forever. According to Mt.Gox version, hackers used a bug in the transaction system that existed from the first day and quietly transferred small amounts of coins to their wallets. For sure the Mt. Gox case is the biggest crypto heist in history.No doubts, scam projects, and hack attacks will continue to emerge in a crypto world. Unfortunately, there is no universal remedy from them, but here are a few tips on how to reduce the risks of being scammed:
Like and share this article if you find it useful. Want more interesting articles on the crypto world? Follow us onMedium, Twitter, Facebook, and Reddit to get Stealthex.io updates and the latest news about the crypto world. For all requests message us at [[email protected]](mailto:[email protected]).
submitted by Stealthex_io to CryptocurrencyICO [link] [comments]

The Biggest Scams In The Crypto History

The cryptocurrency market is often compared to the Wild West. Digital gold, lawlessness, and unlimited Internet space attract not only honest people but also rascals. Today we will show you the loudest scam projects and cyber-attacks that seriously shattered the crypto society.
PayCoin
A mix of cloud mining and Ponzi scheme, which was promoted by Geniuses at Work Corporation Miners (GAW) in 2014. These guys make the first move by renting and selling virtual HashSet miners, which helped them form a loyal audience. Seeing that this project began to go down, the team decided to invent their own coin — PayCoin. People were promised a breakthrough technology, support from banks and other organizations, huge profits, free and fast transactions all around the world. As a result, the project started just awesome, which attracted the attention of a large number of miners and users. As you can guess all creators’ promises didn’t come true — Paycoin started to fall and users filed a lot of court complaint.
In the fall of 2018, the creator of PayCoin, Joshua Garza, was sentenced to 21 months in prison, obliging investors to pay damages of $9.2 million, although the total amount of financial investments was over $54 million.
BitConnect
Do you know how to tell that you’re participating in a scam? Just start with “Wasa Wasa Wasup BitConnect” as Carlos Matos did. BitConnect platform appeared in 2016 and immediately announced its intention to join the elite of the digital economy, bringing super-profits to all project participants without exception. The essence of the criminal scheme was simple: “Invest and get 100% and more.” The organizers promised investors an income of 365% per year! After the enormous excitement of the crypto market, the cost of the BitConnect token was equal to $463. This attracted the attention of reputable persons like Mike Novogratz, Charlie Lee, and Vitalik Buterin. For example, the creator of Litecoin — Charlie Lee — twitted the following:
“From the surface, BitConnect seems like a classic Ponzi scheme. I wouldn’t invest in it and wouldn’t recommend anyone else to.”
But even after such concerns, many people continued to invest in BitConnect. However, in early January 2018, the project unexpectedly turned down all of the activities and closed its platform. Investors were left with nothing. According to general estimates, the investors were deceived for more than $2.5 billion! In the summer of 2018, the head of Bitconnect India Divyesh Darji was arrested.
Beware that on July 1, 2019, a project Bitconnect 2.0 can be launched according to the news posted on Twitterby the same-named user.
Ifan and Pincoin
Start-ups Ifan and Pincoin, owned by the Vietnamese company Modern Tech, raised a whopping $660 million from approximately 32.000 people. The majority of the victims were the citizens of Vietnam. This scam project was labeled the “largest exit scam in recent memory” by TechCrunch.Project’s marketing strategy was so perfect that it was impossible to resist. So Ifan was promoted as “the most advanced social network” for celebrities and their fans. On the other side, Pincoin attracted investors with a promised investment return of 40% per month. The creators of Pincoin wrote about the development of an online platform covering an advertising network, a service for auctions, an investment portal, and P2P platform based on the blockchain.
But in fact both ICOs used a Ponzi scheme: users invested money, received their interest, brought friends and received additional interest. After some time, Modern Tech stopped paying out dividends in fiat and invited users to switch to their own tokens. As a result, they just made a fool of the investors.
This provoked massive rallies in front of the Modern Tech office, during which investors demanded a refund. But the scammers just escaped into the night with a $660 million jackpot.
Mt.Gox
In 2014 Mt.Gox exchange platform was one of the most popular resources for Bitcoin trading: it accounted for more than 70% of all transactions with BTC. A real tidbit, isn’t it?
Unfortunately, Mt.Gox was slowly turning into chaos. In the fall of 2013, US federal agents collected $5 million from the company’s bank account, since Mt.Gox was not registered as a financial intermediary. At the same time, Coinlab, the company’s former partner, filed a lawsuit against Mt.Gox, demanding $75 million. The lawsuit stated that Mt.Gox violated the terms of the agreement with Coinlab and continued to trade in the United States and Canada.
These problems led to failures with the platform. For example, American users waited for months to withdraw funds. In February 2014, Mt.Gox stopped the withdrawal of coins at all and the CEO of Mt.Gox — Mark Karpeles — refused to give any comments. Around the same time, an internal company document became available to the press explaining the reason for the failures — over the past several years around BTC 745,000 were stolen from the service. The total amount worth around $450 million at the time! What’s more, this was approximately 7% of all Bitcoin existing at the time.
“Even the sloppiest of audits should have shown that something had gone wrong, that money was flowing out of Gox accounts.” — The Verge.
Later the 200,000 stolen Bitcoins was found on an old wallet of the company. However, approximately 650,000 remain lost forever. According to Mt.Gox version, hackers used a bug in the transaction system that existed from the first day and quietly transferred small amounts of coins to their wallets. For sure the Mt. Gox case is the biggest crypto heist in history.No doubts, scam projects, and hack attacks will continue to emerge in a crypto world. Unfortunately, there is no universal remedy from them, but here are a few tips on how to reduce the risks of being scammed:
Like and share this article if you find it useful. Want more interesting articles on the crypto world? Follow us onMedium, Twitter, Facebook, and Reddit to get Stealthex.io updates and the latest news about the crypto world. For all requests message us at [[email protected]](mailto:[email protected]).
submitted by Stealthex_io to CryptoCurrencies [link] [comments]

The Biggest Scams In The Crypto History

The cryptocurrency market is often compared to the Wild West. Digital gold, lawlessness, and unlimited Internet space attract not only honest people but also rascals. Today we will show you the loudest scam projects and cyber-attacks that seriously shattered the crypto society.
PayCoin
A mix of cloud mining and Ponzi scheme, which was promoted by Geniuses at Work Corporation Miners (GAW) in 2014. These guys make the first move by renting and selling virtual HashSet miners, which helped them form a loyal audience. Seeing that this project began to go down, the team decided to invent their own coin — PayCoin. People were promised a breakthrough technology, support from banks and other organizations, huge profits, free and fast transactions all around the world. As a result, the project started just awesome, which attracted the attention of a large number of miners and users. As you can guess all creators’ promises didn’t come true — Paycoin started to fall and users filed a lot of court complaint.
In the fall of 2018, the creator of PayCoin, Joshua Garza, was sentenced to 21 months in prison, obliging investors to pay damages of $9.2 million, although the total amount of financial investments was over $54 million.
BitConnect
Do you know how to tell that you’re participating in a scam? Just start with “Wasa Wasa Wasup BitConnect” as Carlos Matos did. BitConnect platform appeared in 2016 and immediately announced its intention to join the elite of the digital economy, bringing super-profits to all project participants without exception. The essence of the criminal scheme was simple: “Invest and get 100% and more.” The organizers promised investors an income of 365% per year! After the enormous excitement of the crypto market, the cost of the BitConnect token was equal to $463. This attracted the attention of reputable persons like Mike Novogratz, Charlie Lee, and Vitalik Buterin. For example, the creator of Litecoin — Charlie Lee — twitted the following:
“From the surface, BitConnect seems like a classic Ponzi scheme. I wouldn’t invest in it and wouldn’t recommend anyone else to.”
But even after such concerns, many people continued to invest in BitConnect. However, in early January 2018, the project unexpectedly turned down all of the activities and closed its platform. Investors were left with nothing. According to general estimates, the investors were deceived for more than $2.5 billion! In the summer of 2018, the head of Bitconnect India Divyesh Darji was arrested.
Beware that on July 1, 2019, a project Bitconnect 2.0 can be launched according to the news posted on Twitterby the same-named user.
Ifan and Pincoin
Start-ups Ifan and Pincoin, owned by the Vietnamese company Modern Tech, raised a whopping $660 million from approximately 32.000 people. The majority of the victims were the citizens of Vietnam. This scam project was labeled the “largest exit scam in recent memory” by TechCrunch.Project’s marketing strategy was so perfect that it was impossible to resist. So Ifan was promoted as “the most advanced social network” for celebrities and their fans. On the other side, Pincoin attracted investors with a promised investment return of 40% per month. The creators of Pincoin wrote about the development of an online platform covering an advertising network, a service for auctions, an investment portal, and P2P platform based on the blockchain.
But in fact both ICOs used a Ponzi scheme: users invested money, received their interest, brought friends and received additional interest. After some time, Modern Tech stopped paying out dividends in fiat and invited users to switch to their own tokens. As a result, they just made a fool of the investors.
This provoked massive rallies in front of the Modern Tech office, during which investors demanded a refund. But the scammers just escaped into the night with a $660 million jackpot.
Mt.Gox
In 2014 Mt.Gox exchange platform was one of the most popular resources for Bitcoin trading: it accounted for more than 70% of all transactions with BTC. A real tidbit, isn’t it?
Unfortunately, Mt.Gox was slowly turning into chaos. In the fall of 2013, US federal agents collected $5 million from the company’s bank account, since Mt.Gox was not registered as a financial intermediary. At the same time, Coinlab, the company’s former partner, filed a lawsuit against Mt.Gox, demanding $75 million. The lawsuit stated that Mt.Gox violated the terms of the agreement with Coinlab and continued to trade in the United States and Canada.
These problems led to failures with the platform. For example, American users waited for months to withdraw funds. In February 2014, Mt.Gox stopped the withdrawal of coins at all and the CEO of Mt.Gox — Mark Karpeles — refused to give any comments. Around the same time, an internal company document became available to the press explaining the reason for the failures — over the past several years around BTC 745,000 were stolen from the service. The total amount worth around $450 million at the time! What’s more, this was approximately 7% of all Bitcoin existing at the time.
“Even the sloppiest of audits should have shown that something had gone wrong, that money was flowing out of Gox accounts.” — The Verge.
Later the 200,000 stolen Bitcoins was found on an old wallet of the company. However, approximately 650,000 remain lost forever. According to Mt.Gox version, hackers used a bug in the transaction system that existed from the first day and quietly transferred small amounts of coins to their wallets. For sure the Mt. Gox case is the biggest crypto heist in history.No doubts, scam projects, and hack attacks will continue to emerge in a crypto world. Unfortunately, there is no universal remedy from them, but here are a few tips on how to reduce the risks of being scammed:
Like and share this article if you find it useful. Want more interesting articles on the crypto world? Follow us onMedium, Twitter, Facebook, and Reddit to get Stealthex.io updates and the latest news about the crypto world. For all requests message us at [[email protected]](mailto:[email protected]).
submitted by Stealthex_io to ICOAnalysis [link] [comments]

The Biggest Scams In The Crypto History

The cryptocurrency market is often compared to the Wild West. Digital gold, lawlessness, and unlimited Internet space attract not only honest people but also rascals. Today we will show you the loudest scam projects and cyber-attacks that seriously shattered the crypto society.
PayCoin
A mix of cloud mining and Ponzi scheme, which was promoted by Geniuses at Work Corporation Miners (GAW) in 2014. These guys make the first move by renting and selling virtual HashSet miners, which helped them form a loyal audience. Seeing that this project began to go down, the team decided to invent their own coin — PayCoin. People were promised a breakthrough technology, support from banks and other organizations, huge profits, free and fast transactions all around the world. As a result, the project started just awesome, which attracted the attention of a large number of miners and users. As you can guess all creators’ promises didn’t come true — Paycoin started to fall and users filed a lot of court complaint.
In the fall of 2018, the creator of PayCoin, Joshua Garza, was sentenced to 21 months in prison, obliging investors to pay damages of $9.2 million, although the total amount of financial investments was over $54 million.
BitConnect
Do you know how to tell that you’re participating in a scam? Just start with “Wasa Wasa Wasup BitConnect” as Carlos Matos did. BitConnect platform appeared in 2016 and immediately announced its intention to join the elite of the digital economy, bringing super-profits to all project participants without exception. The essence of the criminal scheme was simple: “Invest and get 100% and more.” The organizers promised investors an income of 365% per year! After the enormous excitement of the crypto market, the cost of the BitConnect token was equal to $463. This attracted the attention of reputable persons like Mike Novogratz, Charlie Lee, and Vitalik Buterin. For example, the creator of Litecoin — Charlie Lee — twitted the following:
“From the surface, BitConnect seems like a classic Ponzi scheme. I wouldn’t invest in it and wouldn’t recommend anyone else to.”
But even after such concerns, many people continued to invest in BitConnect. However, in early January 2018, the project unexpectedly turned down all of the activities and closed its platform. Investors were left with nothing. According to general estimates, the investors were deceived for more than $2.5 billion! In the summer of 2018, the head of Bitconnect India Divyesh Darji was arrested.
Beware that on July 1, 2019, a project Bitconnect 2.0 can be launched according to the news posted on Twitterby the same-named user.
Ifan and Pincoin
Start-ups Ifan and Pincoin, owned by the Vietnamese company Modern Tech, raised a whopping $660 million from approximately 32.000 people. The majority of the victims were the citizens of Vietnam. This scam project was labeled the “largest exit scam in recent memory” by TechCrunch.Project’s marketing strategy was so perfect that it was impossible to resist. So Ifan was promoted as “the most advanced social network” for celebrities and their fans. On the other side, Pincoin attracted investors with a promised investment return of 40% per month. The creators of Pincoin wrote about the development of an online platform covering an advertising network, a service for auctions, an investment portal, and P2P platform based on the blockchain.
But in fact both ICOs used a Ponzi scheme: users invested money, received their interest, brought friends and received additional interest. After some time, Modern Tech stopped paying out dividends in fiat and invited users to switch to their own tokens. As a result, they just made a fool of the investors.
This provoked massive rallies in front of the Modern Tech office, during which investors demanded a refund. But the scammers just escaped into the night with a $660 million jackpot.
Mt.Gox
In 2014 Mt.Gox exchange platform was one of the most popular resources for Bitcoin trading: it accounted for more than 70% of all transactions with BTC. A real tidbit, isn’t it?
Unfortunately, Mt.Gox was slowly turning into chaos. In the fall of 2013, US federal agents collected $5 million from the company’s bank account, since Mt.Gox was not registered as a financial intermediary. At the same time, Coinlab, the company’s former partner, filed a lawsuit against Mt.Gox, demanding $75 million. The lawsuit stated that Mt.Gox violated the terms of the agreement with Coinlab and continued to trade in the United States and Canada.
These problems led to failures with the platform. For example, American users waited for months to withdraw funds. In February 2014, Mt.Gox stopped the withdrawal of coins at all and the CEO of Mt.Gox — Mark Karpeles — refused to give any comments. Around the same time, an internal company document became available to the press explaining the reason for the failures — over the past several years around BTC 745,000 were stolen from the service. The total amount worth around $450 million at the time! What’s more, this was approximately 7% of all Bitcoin existing at the time.
“Even the sloppiest of audits should have shown that something had gone wrong, that money was flowing out of Gox accounts.” — The Verge.
Later the 200,000 stolen Bitcoins was found on an old wallet of the company. However, approximately 650,000 remain lost forever. According to Mt.Gox version, hackers used a bug in the transaction system that existed from the first day and quietly transferred small amounts of coins to their wallets. For sure the Mt. Gox case is the biggest crypto heist in history.No doubts, scam projects, and hack attacks will continue to emerge in a crypto world. Unfortunately, there is no universal remedy from them, but here are a few tips on how to reduce the risks of being scammed:
Like and share this article if you find it useful. Want more interesting articles on the crypto world? Follow us on Medium, Twitter, Facebook, and Reddit to get Stealthex.io updates and the latest news about the crypto world. For all requests message us at [[email protected]](mailto:[email protected]).
submitted by Stealthex_io to CryptoPolice [link] [comments]

The Biggest Scams In The Crypto History

The cryptocurrency market is often compared to the Wild West. Digital gold, lawlessness, and unlimited Internet space attract not only honest people but also rascals. Today we will show you the loudest scam projects and cyber-attacks that seriously shattered the crypto society.
PayCoin
A mix of cloud mining and Ponzi scheme, which was promoted by Geniuses at Work Corporation Miners (GAW) in 2014. These guys make the first move by renting and selling virtual HashSet miners, which helped them form a loyal audience. Seeing that this project began to go down, the team decided to invent their own coin — PayCoin. People were promised a breakthrough technology, support from banks and other organizations, huge profits, free and fast transactions all around the world. As a result, the project started just awesome, which attracted the attention of a large number of miners and users. As you can guess all creators’ promises didn’t come true — Paycoin started to fall and users filed a lot of court complaint.
In the fall of 2018, the creator of PayCoin, Joshua Garza, was sentenced to 21 months in prison, obliging investors to pay damages of $9.2 million, although the total amount of financial investments was over $54 million.
BitConnect
Do you know how to tell that you’re participating in a scam? Just start with “Wasa Wasa Wasup BitConnect” as Carlos Matos did. BitConnect platform appeared in 2016 and immediately announced its intention to join the elite of the digital economy, bringing super-profits to all project participants without exception. The essence of the criminal scheme was simple: “Invest and get 100% and more.” The organizers promised investors an income of 365% per year! After the enormous excitement of the crypto market, the cost of the BitConnect token was equal to $463. This attracted the attention of reputable persons like Mike Novogratz, Charlie Lee, and Vitalik Buterin. For example, the creator of Litecoin — Charlie Lee — twitted the following:
“From the surface, BitConnect seems like a classic Ponzi scheme. I wouldn’t invest in it and wouldn’t recommend anyone else to.”
But even after such concerns, many people continued to invest in BitConnect. However, in early January 2018, the project unexpectedly turned down all of the activities and closed its platform. Investors were left with nothing. According to general estimates, the investors were deceived for more than $2.5 billion! In the summer of 2018, the head of Bitconnect India Divyesh Darji was arrested.
Beware that on July 1, 2019, a project Bitconnect 2.0 can be launched according to the news posted on Twitter by the same-named user.
Ifan and Pincoin
Start-ups Ifan and Pincoin, owned by the Vietnamese company Modern Tech, raised a whopping $660 million from approximately 32.000 people. The majority of the victims were the citizens of Vietnam. This scam project was labeled the “largest exit scam in recent memory” by TechCrunch.Project’s marketing strategy was so perfect that it was impossible to resist. So Ifan was promoted as “the most advanced social network” for celebrities and their fans. On the other side, Pincoin attracted investors with a promised investment return of 40% per month. The creators of Pincoin wrote about the development of an online platform covering an advertising network, a service for auctions, an investment portal, and P2P platform based on the blockchain.
But in fact both ICOs used a Ponzi scheme: users invested money, received their interest, brought friends and received additional interest. After some time, Modern Tech stopped paying out dividends in fiat and invited users to switch to their own tokens. As a result, they just made a fool of the investors.
This provoked massive rallies in front of the Modern Tech office, during which investors demanded a refund. But the scammers just escaped into the night with a $660 million jackpot.
Mt.Gox
In 2014 Mt.Gox exchange platform was one of the most popular resources for Bitcoin trading: it accounted for more than 70% of all transactions with BTC. A real tidbit, isn’t it?
Unfortunately, Mt.Gox was slowly turning into chaos. In the fall of 2013, US federal agents collected $5 million from the company’s bank account, since Mt.Gox was not registered as a financial intermediary. At the same time, Coinlab, the company’s former partner, filed a lawsuit against Mt.Gox, demanding $75 million. The lawsuit stated that Mt.Gox violated the terms of the agreement with Coinlab and continued to trade in the United States and Canada.
These problems led to failures with the platform. For example, American users waited for months to withdraw funds. In February 2014, Mt.Gox stopped the withdrawal of coins at all and the CEO of Mt.Gox — Mark Karpeles — refused to give any comments. Around the same time, an internal company document became available to the press explaining the reason for the failures — over the past several years around BTC 745,000 were stolen from the service. The total amount worth around $450 million at the time! What’s more, this was approximately 7% of all Bitcoin existing at the time.
“Even the sloppiest of audits should have shown that something had gone wrong, that money was flowing out of Gox accounts.” — The Verge.
Later the 200,000 stolen Bitcoins was found on an old wallet of the company. However, approximately 650,000 remain lost forever. According to Mt.Gox version, hackers used a bug in the transaction system that existed from the first day and quietly transferred small amounts of coins to their wallets. For sure the Mt. Gox case is the biggest crypto heist in history.No doubts, scam projects, and hack attacks will continue to emerge in a crypto world. Unfortunately, there is no universal remedy from them, but here are a few tips on how to reduce the risks of being scammed:
Like and share this article if you find it useful. Want more interesting articles on the crypto world? Follow us on Medium, Twitter, Facebook, and Reddit to get Stealthex.io updates and the latest news about the crypto world. For all requests message us at [email protected].
submitted by Stealthex_io to u/Stealthex_io [link] [comments]

The Biggest Scams In The Crypto History

The cryptocurrency market is often compared to the Wild West. Digital gold, lawlessness, and unlimited Internet space attract not only honest people but also rascals. Today we will show you the loudest scam projects and cyber-attacks that seriously shattered the crypto society.
PayCoin
A mix of cloud mining and Ponzi scheme, which was promoted by Geniuses at Work Corporation Miners (GAW) in 2014. These guys make the first move by renting and selling virtual HashSet miners, which helped them form a loyal audience. Seeing that this project began to go down, the team decided to invent their own coin — PayCoin. People were promised a breakthrough technology, support from banks and other organizations, huge profits, free and fast transactions all around the world. As a result, the project started just awesome, which attracted the attention of a large number of miners and users. As you can guess all creators’ promises didn’t come true — Paycoin started to fall and users filed a lot of court complaint.
In the fall of 2018, the creator of PayCoin, Joshua Garza, was sentenced to 21 months in prison, obliging investors to pay damages of $9.2 million, although the total amount of financial investments was over $54 million.
BitConnect
Do you know how to tell that you’re participating in a scam? Just start with “Wasa Wasa Wasup BitConnect” as Carlos Matos did. BitConnect platform appeared in 2016 and immediately announced its intention to join the elite of the digital economy, bringing super-profits to all project participants without exception. The essence of the criminal scheme was simple: “Invest and get 100% and more.” The organizers promised investors an income of 365% per year! After the enormous excitement of the crypto market, the cost of the BitConnect token was equal to $463. This attracted the attention of reputable persons like Mike Novogratz, Charlie Lee, and Vitalik Buterin. For example, the creator of Litecoin — Charlie Lee — twitted the following:
“From the surface, BitConnect seems like a classic Ponzi scheme. I wouldn’t invest in it and wouldn’t recommend anyone else to.”
But even after such concerns, many people continued to invest in BitConnect. However, in early January 2018, the project unexpectedly turned down all of the activities and closed its platform. Investors were left with nothing. According to general estimates, the investors were deceived for more than $2.5 billion! In the summer of 2018, the head of Bitconnect India Divyesh Darji was arrested.
Beware that on July 1, 2019, a project Bitconnect 2.0 can be launched according to the news posted on Twitterby the same-named user.
Ifan and Pincoin
Start-ups Ifan and Pincoin, owned by the Vietnamese company Modern Tech, raised a whopping $660 million from approximately 32.000 people. The majority of the victims were the citizens of Vietnam. This scam project was labeled the “largest exit scam in recent memory” by TechCrunch.Project’s marketing strategy was so perfect that it was impossible to resist. So Ifan was promoted as “the most advanced social network” for celebrities and their fans. On the other side, Pincoin attracted investors with a promised investment return of 40% per month. The creators of Pincoin wrote about the development of an online platform covering an advertising network, a service for auctions, an investment portal, and P2P platform based on the blockchain.
But in fact both ICOs used a Ponzi scheme: users invested money, received their interest, brought friends and received additional interest. After some time, Modern Tech stopped paying out dividends in fiat and invited users to switch to their own tokens. As a result, they just made a fool of the investors.
This provoked massive rallies in front of the Modern Tech office, during which investors demanded a refund. But the scammers just escaped into the night with a $660 million jackpot.
Mt.Gox
In 2014 Mt.Gox exchange platform was one of the most popular resources for Bitcoin trading: it accounted for more than 70% of all transactions with BTC. A real tidbit, isn’t it?
Unfortunately, Mt.Gox was slowly turning into chaos. In the fall of 2013, US federal agents collected $5 million from the company’s bank account, since Mt.Gox was not registered as a financial intermediary. At the same time, Coinlab, the company’s former partner, filed a lawsuit against Mt.Gox, demanding $75 million. The lawsuit stated that Mt.Gox violated the terms of the agreement with Coinlab and continued to trade in the United States and Canada.
These problems led to failures with the platform. For example, American users waited for months to withdraw funds. In February 2014, Mt.Gox stopped the withdrawal of coins at all and the CEO of Mt.Gox — Mark Karpeles — refused to give any comments. Around the same time, an internal company document became available to the press explaining the reason for the failures — over the past several years around BTC 745,000 were stolen from the service. The total amount worth around $450 million at the time! What’s more, this was approximately 7% of all Bitcoin existing at the time.
“Even the sloppiest of audits should have shown that something had gone wrong, that money was flowing out of Gox accounts.” — The Verge.
Later the 200,000 stolen Bitcoins was found on an old wallet of the company. However, approximately 650,000 remain lost forever. According to Mt.Gox version, hackers used a bug in the transaction system that existed from the first day and quietly transferred small amounts of coins to their wallets. For sure the Mt. Gox case is the biggest crypto heist in history.No doubts, scam projects, and hack attacks will continue to emerge in a crypto world. Unfortunately, there is no universal remedy from them, but here are a few tips on how to reduce the risks of being scammed:
Like and share this article if you find it useful. Want more interesting articles on the crypto world? Follow us onMedium, Twitter, Facebook, and Reddit to get Stealthex.io updates and the latest news about the crypto world. For all requests message us at [[email protected]](mailto:[email protected]).
submitted by Stealthex_io to CryptoCluster [link] [comments]

Can we talk about GAW?

After the GOX disaster took so many people by surprise, I feel that it’s worth bringing forward the madness that’s happening over at GAW for those that may be considering throwing some money their way. This especially with the launch of their “hash coin” later today.
First off, I’m not some whistle blower or insider with secret information, just an enthusiast who cannot believe the amount of money people appear to be giving them despite red flags from here to forever. I know this post likely won’t do anything, but given the number of people casually trying to get into cryptocurrencies and seeing GAW as a good/accessible option it’s worth trying to bring up the discussion.
You should always be aware of anyone promising anything too good to be true. Here we have a company that has promised guaranteed returns and "profitability" more times than I can count. There is no such thing as a sure thing, especially in markets as unpredictable as crypto, and especially on the scale they talk about. Also those returns have yet to materialize for anyone but the very first buyers (interesting...).
They’ve created their own forum and aggressively policed any thread they have access to across the web to stamp out negative feedback. Their customer service by all accounts is a disaster and the only way to get a timely response is to post publically. There are many accounts that they ended up sending out whatever hardware they had lying around to people trying to buy their custom machines (war machines, etc) and then denying it.
On their forum you get money for upvotes, lose money from your account for downvotes, get bonus money from the CEO if he likes your post, and with enough downvotes you get autobanned. You can imagine what kind of a community this creates. Negative posts of any kind get you banned and the threads removed by admins immediately.
Next we have their pool system. They have their own pool (Zenpool) that always seemed to have the best payout, yet no explanation of how it is remotely possible. It doesn’t take a think tank to imagine how easy it would be to sell your propriety mining pool as a higher buy in, subsidize the difference in rates out of pocket to secure purchases and then do whatever you want with the money.
Zenpool and cloud hashing contracts are the most incredibly perfect setup for a Ponzi scheme you could ever create, and people continue to buy despite the utter lack of transparency, explanation, or established reputation that would make this seem credible. Imagine this, give me 20 dollars today and I’ll give you 1.2 cents a day (minus maintenance) instead of the 1.1 cent you would get elsewhere. Sure sounds like a cost effective way to raise a bunch of money fast.
If GAW disappeared tomorrow with everyone’s money it would in hindsight seem like the most obvious thing in the world. I am not saying that it is a Ponzi scheme, just that JESUS CHRIST does it look like one with no effort to prove itself otherwise. Even if it’s not a Ponzi scheme this sure does seem like it could be one of those Butterfly labs situations where a lot of personal stuff (e.g. private jets) gets charged to company cards until they go bankrupt.
Finally we have “Hash Coin” – there are so many things wrong with this it’s hard to summarize. You can read their QA here. But in short they’re launching an ICO that, in their words: “will go “public” for just over $20 a coin.” According to “analysts and banks”. And that “there will be a “bank” that will manage, to some degree, the valuation of Hashcoin” However of course you cannot know who these bankers or analysts are as: “The identities of both the analysts and banks will be released once the ICO has completed and the merchant marketplace established in the near future.”
And this magic coin will have a market cap of 5Billion (!!). For quick reference Bitcoin sits at roughly 4.4.
I am sure there is a debate all on its own for the ICO, but it betrays such a huge misunderstanding of some of the fundamentals of this space all it does is create more red flags for me.
Somewhere there is a whitepaper that is “done” but instead of releasing it for community review and feedback they’ve plowed ahead with some crazy bankeanalyst backed offering in which everyone – especially you – can make boatloads of money. This ICO deserves a post on it’s own, but given that it’s launching tonight there should be plenty on entertainment there for later. Again, their quote "A white paper will not answer ICO questions. That is what is more important."
In short: They’re running a system with constantly promised returns that has done anything but that. They’re running what could easily be a textbook Ponzi scheme on a huge scale with zero transparency. They’re issuing their own currency that “analysts” and “banks” have assured them will be worth giant multiples of what you will be able to buy it for, and have a market cap of 5,000,000,000 USD.
I'm all for people trying wild and crazy (and big) ideas in the space, but another GOX (Butterfly Labs, etc.) is not what we need. If GAW is a legitimate well run organization then the community should ask for more transparency and information before giving them any more money.
And finally, there’s this post. (*update, they took down the image but someone sent me a screenshot they took.)
They literally have post praising themselves for taking money from a man who has a sick family and mounting medical bills for a product that will likely never (ever) return to him what he paid for it. And the image they have chosen for this post - well, it's of the CEO and community manager in a private jet. (** update 2, I was contacted by someone who claims to own the site and says it's not affiliated with GAW. So, fair enough for a disclaimer. They are however still doing these things even if it's a repost of theirs, so point still stands.)
TL;DR Everyone gives GAW money despite the fact that they are too busy flying on private jets to answer your support emails or explain how their definitely-not-a-ponzi-scheme operation works exactly. But hey, let's all go buy some Hash Coin* which is totally better than Bitcoin! (*whitepaper pending)
(edit: formatting)
Update: "Whitepaper" draft is out for hashcoin, and it's hilarious. We're 20 days out from their ICO and they haven't released anything for the community to review or comment on, and if this is the direction they're going it's going to be quite the ride.
Update 2: It's been mentioned a number of times here, but worth noting for anyone even remotely looking at the hashlets and their "guaranteed profitability" that maintenance fees are 80% of earnings at this point. The break even point for all products is never given any kind of difficulty increase and multiple years assuming none. I cannot say I understand how GAW calculates profitability, but doesn't seem to be the way I do.
Update 3: And a couple more to underscore the point. From their own terms of service: "Hashlets are virtual service units related to mining services, but are not mining hardware." Hashlets are not real, might not have anything to do with hardware! "11. Termination and Modifications. a. Services may be terminated by us, without cause, at any time." And, GAW can simply cancel the service at any time and keep your money!
Update 4: Link to the SEC site to report suspicious activity: https://denebleo.sec.gov/TCRExternal/questionaire.xhtml
Update 5: CoinFire publishes story on possible dishonesty on the part of GAW with regards to partners, gets hacked. Thread with more information here: http://www.reddit.com/Bitcoin/comments/2n7c9coinfire_publishes_article_with_details_about_gaw/
submitted by redflagsforever to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Bitcoin 2015 so far

I don't know about you guys, but I've noticed that shit in bitcoin-land seems to be moving faster and faster... I browse this sub and a few other communities daily, and I've been making a short note whenever something significant happens. Lots of good, even more bad, probably a lot of stuff that I missed, and plenty of sweet drama :) Here's what I've got for January 2015
(these are not in exact order)
Again, probably lots that I missed, but all in all it's been a pretty balls-to-the-wall last 4 weeks. I don't have time to find references for all of these, but if another redditor wants to do it that would be cool. Here's to another month of madness
tl;dr running out of popcorn, need to buy more.
edit adding in some other items people mentioned below
submitted by cryptonaut420 to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

The Truth About PayCoin

GAW CEO Josh Garza and his company have taken the crypto community by storm this month after their announcement of PayCoin. PayCoin (XPY) has made some headlines in the crypto community after what has been dubbed the most successful launch of an altcoin thus far.
Despite sky rocketing prices to upwards of $15 the Bitcoin community as a whole has seemed to have shunned this new self proclaimed revolutionary coin. Perhaps this is due to the mysterious nature in which Paycoin operates. Trying to gain a better understanding of this new currency I contacted XPY's creator GAW.
I have experience dealing with GAW. I purchased their Black Widow 14 Mh/s miner for a ridiculously high cost. By the time I received the hardware its price had already dropped +70% from the price I purchased it at. A lot of people lost money when buying hardware from GAW but of course GAW themselves made a killing profiting +150 M from selling the mining equipment. Proponents of XPY argue that this proves the Paycoin model has an enormous financial backing behind its development.
A grand marketing scheme paints Paycoin as the currency of the people; the currency of tomorrow. Speculation has been made solely off the fact that PayCoin has marketed itself as a currency which will be quickly adopted by the international community with ease.
PayCoin however is fundamentally different than BTC in many ways. Suspect of the whole entire operation I asked GAW what percentage of PayCoin were premined. The telephone operator told me they weren't premined they were prestaked. By that she means the currency's creators started off with their "self appointed fair share". Prestaked is a synonym for Premined. If the CEO Josh Garza decided to start himself off with say 75% of the PayCoin then he essentially just declared himself king.
We don't know the history of PayCoin there is no public ledger on a Blockchain. Its coin's entire existence seems to operate under a dark shadow of secrecy. GAW acts as the coin's creator and determiner of its fate.
PayCoin describes itself as a better alternative to Bitcoin, but is it? PayCoins are not mined like Bitcoins. They are minted, that means PayCoins are only created by generating interest. By purchasing what the company is calling hashlets one can use their system of cloud based mining to temporarily generate new coin. This is how more PayCoin are put into existence. Only GAW determines when they will sell more hashlets. So I must pay GAW to get their service they call Hashtakers which will allow you to mint new PayCoin. The more one examines this operation the more the it looks like a Ponzi scheme.
If CEO of GAW "prestaked" 10,000,000 PayCoin and sets the initial price of his currency at $20 (which is where he is placing his initial valuation) he has magically created 200 million dollars for himself and his company out of thin air. He then will only continue to make more money as users pay his company in order to put more Paycoin into existence through minting.
At every corner of the game GAW wins in this scenario, the more one begins to dissect PayCoin and the power structure behind it the more it seems like it is an elaborate scheme. After reviewing the source code many have come to the same conclusion that PayCoin is merely a clone of PeerCoin (PPC) a coin which offers fast transaction times yet has been declining in popularity in recent months. Is the recent rise of XPY just another pump and dump in the world of alt coins or is Paycoin here to stay?
Speculators have been taken back by the big engine behind the currency, however fail to see that PayCoin is different perhaps for all the wrong reasons.
PayCoin is controlled by a centralized ruling authority, the company GAW miners is its creator and ruler who rules from behind the curtain. I believe to be a viable crypto currency to the mainstream world one must gain acceptance from the crypto community that is already in existence. When the truth of how GAW dominates everything that is PayCoin comes to light it may be difficult to gain that acceptance.
submitted by OREBEL to CryptoCurrency [link] [comments]

Looking back, ASICs were bad for Doge.

Dogecoin mining used to be amazing. Miners all over the world building these rigs, connecting to this global network of computers coming together to support this crazy idea of a decentralized/distributed crypto currency based off of a Shiba Inu. Our stupid little dog coin actually had some value, which was enough to fuel this crazy passion of mining. Then the ASICs came. They took dogecoin mining away from the common man. How long has it been since anyone has been able to break even? The only ones who really mine are a few shibes with already outdated ASICs and the big guys. The big guys like GAW and ZEUS. We can no longer profitably mine with off the shelf parts. All of mining is at the mercy of a few corporations and the silicon they develop. We have turned from a global community of miners, to the whims of a big few. I used to be able to roll over in my sleep and hear the noise of my GPU fans, to feel the heat of 100% load. I would chuckle to myself that I was crazy enough to spend my hard earned money and research enough to build this crazy machine to support Doge. Those days have passed. No ASIC on the market for a while now has been able to even suggest breaking even, and No one can recommend buying one. The few corporations we put our trust with ASICs have now actually shifted their focus to cloud mining; Literally opposite in philosophy to decentralized mining. At any moment, your cloud mining provider could take your miner from you, and you couldn't stop them. But what about the x11 coins!? What will happen when ASICs come out for x11 coins, and then x13 coins? The main reason for the creation of litecoin was it was GPU profitable as the Bitcoin ASICs started rolling in. Will we mine and kill every coin on our destructive path of ASICs? Coin mining, to be truly successful as a long term strategy should be feasible with off the shelf computing parts, and not custom silicon thats useless once its outdated.
submitted by ibayibay1 to dogemining [link] [comments]

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As many of you know, GAW Miners is a company that we here at Coin Brief have found very interesting. They started as a Scrypt mining company, and eventually added SHA-256 ASICs for Bitcoin mining, but that is not what has interested us about them. The CEO of GAW, Josh Garza, is one of the most vocal CEOs in the cryptocurrency world, and is actively engages with the GAW customer base on their ... A community dedicated to Bitcoin, the currency of the Internet. Bitcoin is a distributed, worldwide, decentralized digital money. Bitcoins are... – GAW Miners is a company that started selling ASIC miners, then moved into cloud mining and are now moving to the next step – introducing their own crypto coin and building an whole ecosystem around it. They are essentially moving away from cloud mining services and moving to another business that they see as a better and more profitable alternative, we are yet to see how things will ... GAW Miners was a popular and reputable source of crypto mining equipment around 2014. Garza actually was considered a crypto celebrity and had pull across social media during that time. However, the company switched its strategy from selling physical crypto mining rigs to offering a cloud mining service, offering “hashlets” to customers which represented a certain amount of mining power. These suspected activities continued to raise eyebrows as Garza introduced his altcoin Paycoin that also included cloud services. In the end, the mining operation CEO allegedly sold 41% of GAW ...

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